Childhood Obesity

Let's Get The Next Generation Moving Again

" NEW REPORT FINDS MISSOURI HAS THE 13 HIGHEST PERCENT OF OBESE ADULTS AND THE 23RD HIGHEST PERCENT OF OBESE AND OVERWEIGHT CHILDREN IN THE U.S. "

  • Sportica Life will serve the Saint Louis community by focusing on childhood obesity in Missouri, while helping the next generation to become more productive and healthier.  The goal is to lower health care costs in Saint Louis. The childhood obesity program is based on two simple facts: 1. Healthier children are more productive than chronically ill children. 2. It costs less to prevent injuries or illnesses than to treat them after they occur. At Sportica Life we tie childhood obesity directly to the health care issue. We believe the traditional approaches to the childhood obesity crisis are misdirected. These traditional efforts is are only reactive, wait until after the child has been stricken with illness or injury and then pay for the necessary treatments. 


  • The Sportica Life approach emphasizes prevention is much more proactive. By offering childhood weight management programs, we can change behavior patterns and guide them to healthier lifestyles. Sportica Life will also lower health care expenditures, while raising productivity and reducing school absenteeism while reducing hospital stays. The state of America's childhood obesity crisis coupled with current demographic changes threaten to not only exacerbate the crisis, but further erode the next generation's chances to be productive citizens. These environmental factors coupled with the local competitive situation signal a favorable opportunity in this market. 


Reference Page: www.ealthyamericans.org/reports/obesity2009/release.php?stateid=MO


Sound Mind Sound Body

PREPARE

                                                           

THE NEXT

GENERATION

The State of Childhood Obesity

  • " The latest data show that the national childhood obesity rate among 2- to 19-year-olds is 18.5 percent. The rate varies among different age groups, with rates rising along with age. While overall obesity rates remain higher than they were a generation ago, the rise in rates has slowed in recent years, following decades of sharp increases starting in the early 1970s.1"